Lemelson–MIT Prize

The Lemelson-MIT Program awards several prizes yearly to inventors in the United States. The largest is the Lemelson–MIT Prize which was endowed in 1994 by Jerome H. Lemelson, funded by the Lemelson Foundation, and is administered through the School of Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The winner receives $500,000, making it the largest cash prize for invention in the U.S.
The $100,000 Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation (previously named the Award for Sustainability) was last awarded in 2013. The Award for Global Innovation replaced the $100,000 Lemelson-MIT Lifetime Achievement Award, which was awarded from 1995-2006. The Lifetime Achievement Award recognized outstanding individuals whose pioneering spirit and inventiveness throughout their careers improved society and inspired others.
The Lemelson-MIT Program also awards invention prizes for college students, called the Lemelson-MIT Student Prize.

Contents

1 List of winners
2 See also
3 References
4 External links

List of winners[edit]

2016

Ramesh Raskar (Lemelson–MIT Prize)[1]

2015

Jay Whitacre (Lemelson–MIT Prize)[2]

2014

Sangeeta N. Bhatia (Lemelson–MIT Prize)

2013

Angela Belcher (Lemelson–MIT Prize)[3]
Rebecca Richards-Kortum and Maria Oden (Lemelson–MIT Award for Global Innovation)

2012

Stephen Quake

Stephen Quake (Lemelson–MIT Prize)[4]

(Scientist, Inventor, Entrepreneur, Professor of Biophysics and Genomics at Stanford University)

Ashok Gadgil (Lemelson–MIT Award for Global Innovation)

2011

John A. Rogers

John A. Rogers (Lemelson–MIT Prize)

(Professor, Physical Chemist, and Materials Scientist at Northwestern University)

Elizabeth Hausler (Lemelson–MIT Award for Sustainability)

2010

Carolyn Bertozzi, receiving the Emanuel Merck Lectureship in 2011

Carolyn Bertozzi (Lemelson–MIT Prize)
BP Agrawal (Lemelson–MIT Award for Sustainability)

2009

Chad Mirkin

Chad Mirkin (Lemelson–MIT Prize)

George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Medicine, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, and Director of the International Institute for Nanotechnology and Center for Nanofabrication and Molecular Self-Assembly at Northwestern University

Joel Selanikio[5] (Lemelson–MIT Award for Sustainability)

CEO and co-Founder, Magpi, and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Georgetown Universi

HMS Boscawen (1844)

For other ships with the same name, see HMS Boscawen.

HMS Boscawen, 1904

History

UK

Name:
HMS Boscawen

Ordered:
11 May 1817

Builder:
Woolwich Dockyard

Laid down:
January 1826

Launched:
3 April 1844

Fate:
Broken up, 1914

General characteristics [1]

Class and type:
70-gun third rate ship of the line

Tons burthen:
2048 tons (2080.9 tonnes)

Length:
187 ft 4 1⁄2 in (57.1 m) (gundeck)

Beam:
50 ft 9 in (15.47 m)

Depth of hold:
21 ft 6 in (6.55 m)

Propulsion:
Sails

Sail plan:
Full rigged ship

Armament:

70 guns:
Gundeck: 28 × 32 pdrs, 2 × 68 pdr carronades
Upper gundeck: 32 × 24 pdrs
Quarterdeck: 4 × 24 pdrs, 10 × 32 pdr carronades
Forecastle: 2 × 24 pdrs, 2 × 32 pdr carronades

HMS Boscawan was a 70-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 3 April 1844 at Woolwich Dockyard. She was originally ordered and begun as a 74-gun ship, but an Admiralty order dated 3 March 1834 required that she be reworked to Sir William Symonds’ design.[1] She was named for Admiral Edward Boscawen.
In 1874, Boscawen was converted into a training ship and renamed Wellesley.[citation needed] She was broken up in 1914.[1]
Notes[edit]

^ a b c Lavery, Ships of the Line, vol. 1, p. 192.

References[edit]

Lavery, Brian (2003) The Ship of the Line – Volume 1: The development of the battlefleet 1650-1850. Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-252-8.

This article about a ship of the line of the United Kingdom is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Olympus SP-510 Ultra Zoom

Olympus SP-510UZ (Ultra Zoom)

Overview

Type
Bridge digital camera

Lens

Lens
Fixed 38 – 380mm (10x Optical Zoom)

Sensor/Medium

Sensor
1/2.5″ CCD

Maximum resolution
3,072 × 2304 (7.1 megapixels)

ASA/ISO range
Auto,50–4000 (2500 and 4000 are used up to 3mp)

Storage
xD Picture Card

Focusing

Focus modes
iESP, auto, spot AF, selective AF target, manual

Exposure/Metering

Exposure modes
Digital iESP multi-pattern, Center-Weighted, Spot [1]

Shutter

Shutter speed range
15 s – 1/1000 s, Bulb

Continuous shooting
1.65 frame/s

Viewfinder

Viewfinder
Electronic viewfinder

General

Rear LCD monitor
2.5″ TFT LCD, 115,000 pixels, live preview capable

Battery
4 AA Batteries

Weight
11.6 oz / 325 g (w/o batteries and memory card)

Made in
 Indonesia

The Olympus SP-510UZ (Ultra Zoom) is a 7.1-megapixel bridge digital camera introduced by Olympus Corporation in 2006. It replaced the 6 megapixel SP-500UZ model that was launched in 2005. It was the last model of the SP-series (Special Performance) that used a 10x optical zoom lens. It was also the last of the larger-sized 10x optical ultra zoom cameras to be made by Olympus, which had been part of the C-series before the SP-series was produced. The SP-510UZ model can be traced back to the C-2100 Ultra Zoom, which was launched back in 2000. [2] The successor model to the SP-510UZ was the SP-550UZ. It used a longer 18x optical zoom lens. Today, the newest model in the Ultra Zoom camera line, the SP-590UZ, features a 26x optical zoom lens. In 2009, Olympus released a compact camera with a 10x optical zoom lens. However, it does not use the Ultra Zoom name nor is it a part of the SP-series line of cameras. [3]

Contents

1 Features
2 Lens
3 Flash
4 Movies
5 Power source
6 Accessories
7 References
8 External links

Features[edit]
The Olympus SP-510UZ features a 2.5″ LCD display, a 10x zoom lens, and 5x digital zoom in a compact lightweight plastic body. It is designed to satisfy the needs of both hobbyist photographers who desire full control over exposure settings and those that need only point and shoot simplicity. Two notable features of the camera is that it contains an EVF (electronic view finder), a feature found in high-end digital cameras, and the ability to capture images in RAW format. The SP-510UZ has an earlier sister model, the SP-500UZ. Two major differences between the two cameras are that the SP-500UZ has a 6.0MP sensor and has a black body while the SP-51

Bildirçinli

This article may be expanded with text translated from the corresponding article in Azerbaijani. (June 2015) Click [show] for important translation instructions. 

View a machine-translated version of the Azerbaijani article.
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Coordinates: 40°28′N 46°56′E / 40.467°N 46.933°E / 40.467; 46.933

Bildirçinli

Bildirçinli

Coordinates: 40°28′N 46°56′E / 40.467°N 46.933°E / 40.467; 46.933

Country
 Azerbaijan

Rayon
Tartar

Municipality
Sarov

Time zone
AZT (UTC+4)

 • Summer (DST)
AZT (UTC+5)

Bildirçinli (also, Bildirchinli) is a village in the Tartar Rayon of Azerbaijan. The village forms part of the municipality of Sarov.[1]
References[edit]

^ “Belediyye Informasiya Sistemi” (in Azerbaijani). Archived from the original on September 24, 2008. 

Bildirçinli (as Bildirchinli) at GEOnet Names Server

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Tartar Rayon

Capital: Tərtər

Ağabəyyalı
Aganz
Agaps
Aghdara
Ağkənd
Alışarlı
Armenavan
Aşağı Oratağ
Aşağı Qapanlı
Ashaga-Seidimly
Aslanlar
Azad Qaraqoyunlu
Bala Kəngərli
Bayandur
Bayandurlu
Bəyimsarov
Bildirçinli
Borsunlu
Buruc
Çanyataq
Çardaqlı
Çaylı
Cəmilli
Chinari
Dəmirçilər
Dəmirli
Dostagir
Düyərli
Dzhamilli Vtoryye
Ələsgərli
Əskipara
Evoğlu
Godaksar
Goravena
Göyarx
Güləbatlı
Gülyataq
Hacallı
Hacıqərvənd
Həsənqaya
Hüseynli
İlxıçılar
İrəvanlı
İsmayılbəyli
Jraberd
Kakhrylyar
Kəbirli
Kəngərli
Kiçan
Kiçik Qarabəy
Köçərli
Kövdadıq
Kyrmyzykena
Lüləsaz
Madagiz
Mamırlı
Maraga
Maralyansarov
Miqrelalay
Muzur
Nerkin Chaylu
Pitomnik
Poladlı
Qaraağacı
Qaradağlı
Qasapet
Qaynaq
Qazyan
Qırmızı-Saqqallar
Qızıloba
Rəcəbli
Sarıcalı
Sarov
Sarvanlar
Səhləbad
Seydimli
Seysulan
Shorbulag
Şıxarx
Soyulan
Talış
Təzəkənd
Tonaşen
Ulu Qarabəy
Umudlu
Umudlu
Xoruzlu
Yegakor
Yenikənd
Yerek-Mankunk
Yuxarı Qapanl

Everything’s Ducky

Everything’s Ducky

Theatrical release poster

Directed by
Don Taylor

Produced by
Allen Baron
Merrill S. Brody
Red Doff

Screenplay by
Benedict Freedman
John Fenton Murray

Starring
Mickey Rooney
Buddy Hackett
Jackie Cooper
Joanie Sommers
Roland Winters
Elizabeth MacRae

Music by
Bernard Green

Cinematography
Carl E. Guthrie

Edited by
Richard K. Brockway

Production
company

Barbroo Productions

Distributed by
Columbia Pictures

Release date

December 20, 1961 (1961-12-20)

Running time

80 minutes

Country
United States

Language
English

Everything’s Ducky is a 1961 comedy film directed by Don Taylor and written by Benedict Freedman and John Fenton Murray. The film stars Mickey Rooney, Buddy Hackett, Jackie Cooper, Joanie Sommers, Roland Winters and Elizabeth MacRae. The film was released on December 20, 1961, by Columbia Pictures.[1][2]

Contents

1 Plot
2 Cast
3 References
4 External links

Plot[edit]
Two sailors sneak a talking duck aboard their ship. Complications ensue. The duck waddles all over the ship until he escapes.
Cast[edit]

Mickey Rooney as Kermit ‘Beetle’ McKay
Buddy Hackett as Seaman Admiral John Paul ‘Ad’ Jones
Jackie Cooper as Lt. J.S. Parmell
Joanie Sommers as Nina Lloyd
Roland Winters as Capt. Lewis Bollinger
Elizabeth MacRae as Susie Penrose
Gene Blakely as Lt. Cmdr. Bernard Kemp
Gordon Jones as Chief Petty Officer Conroy
Richard Deacon as Dr. Deckham
James Millhollin as George Imhoff
Jimmy Cross as Drunk
Robert Williams as Duck Hunter
King Calder as Frank
Ellie Kent as Nurse
William Hellinger as Corpsman
Ann Morell as Wave
George Sawaya as Simmons
Dick Winslow as Fröehlich
Alvy Moore as Jim Lipscott
Walker Edmiston as Scuttlebutt – The Duck

References[edit]

^ “Everything’s Ducky (1961) – Overview”. TCM.com. 1961-11-08. Retrieved 2015-08-08. 
^ “Movie Review – – ‘Mysterious Island’ and Comedy Open”. NYTimes.com. 1961-12-21. Retrieved 2015-08-08. 

External links[edit]

Everything’s Ducky at the Internet Movie Database
Everything’s Ducky at the TCM Movie Database

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Films directed by Don Taylor

Everything’s Ducky (1961)
Ride the Wild Surf (1964)
Jack of Diamonds (1967)
The Five Man Army (1969)
Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971)
Tom Sawyer (1973)
Echoes of a Summer (1976)
The Great Scout & Cathouse Thursday (1976)
The Island of Dr. Moreau (1977)
Damien: Omen II (1978)
The Final Countdown (1980)

This film article about

Jordan Mohilowski

Jordan Mohilowski

Background information

Born
(1984-07-19) July 19, 1984 (age 32)

Origin
Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida

Genres
CCM, Pop, Rock, Country

Occupation(s)
Songwriter and Producer

Years active
2003–present

Associated acts
The Afters, R5, Hawk Nelson, Selah, StorySide:B

Jordan Nicholas Mohilowski is an American songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist, based in Nashville, Tennessee. He is the drummer for the Contemporary Christian Music band The Afters[1] as well as a songwriter and producer. He is currently signed to Disney Music Publishing[2] in partnership with pop songwriters/producers Emanuel Kiriakou and E. Kidd Bogart. Jordan is a GMA Dove Award winner[3] and has received multiple BMI Awards for having some of the most performed songs on U.S. Christian radio.[4]

Contents

1 Discography (selected)
2 Awards
3 References
4 External links

Discography (selected)[edit]

Year
Artist
Album
Song/Credits

2016
The Afters
Live On Forever
– “Live On Forever” (Single)
– “Battles” (Single)
– “Legends”
– “Wake Up My Heart”
– “Shadows”
– “Sunrise”
– “Eyes Of A Believer”
– “Time Of My Life”
– “Survivors”
– “When You’re With Me”

Co-writer, Producer

Jorge Blanco
Tini
– “Light Your Heart”[5]

Co-writer, Producer

Ruggero Pasquarelli, Lionel Ferro, Michael Ronda, Jorge López, Agustín Bernasconi & Gastón Vietto
Soy Luna
– “I’d Be Crazy”

Co-Writer, Producer

2015
Hawk Nelson
Diamonds
– “Just Getting Started”[6]

Co-writer, Producer

2014
R5
Heart Made Up On You[5]
– “Heart Made Up On You” (Single)

Co-writer, Co-Producer

Selah
You Amaze Us
– “You Amaze Us” (Single)[7]

Co-writer, Producer

2013
Hawk Nelson
Made
– “Elevator”[8]

Co-writer

The Afters
Life Is Beautiful[9]
– “Moments Like This”[10]

Co-writer, Producer

– “Broken Hallelujah” (Single)[11]
– “Life Is Beautiful”[12]
– “Love Is In The Air”[13]
– “With You Always”[14]

Co-writer

2011
The Afters
Light Up The Sky
– “Lift Me Up” (Single)[15]
– “Life Is Sweeter”[16]

Co-writer

2007
StorySide:B
We Are Not Alone[5]
– “Be Still” (Single)[17]
– “Tell Me What You Think Of God” (Single)[18]
– “I Give You Me”[19]
– “For You”[20]
– “Don’t Let Go”[21]

Co-writer

2005
StorySide:B
Everything and More
– “Miracle” (Single)
– “More To This Life” (Single)
– “It’s Not Over”
– “Hold Me Down”
– “You’re Not Alone”
– “Breath”
– “Send Me A Sign”
– “Dance To Me”
– “In Your Eyes”

Co-writer

Awards[edit]

2015 BMI Award for “Broken Hallelujah”[4]

Michael Knight (RAF officer)

Sir Michael Knight

Born
(1932-11-23) 23 November 1932 (age 84)

Allegiance
United Kingdom

Service/branch
Royal Air Force

Years of service
1953–89

Rank
Air Chief Marshal

Commands held
Air Member for Supply and Organisation (1983–85)
No. 1 Group (1980–82)

Awards
Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath
Air Force Cross

Air Chief Marshal Sir Michael William Patrick Knight, KCB, AFC (born 23 November 1932) is a former senior Royal Air Force commander. He is well respected and renowned for his various charity projects, especially for the “Vulcan to the Sky” cause.
RAF career[edit]
Knight joined the Royal Air Force in 1953.[1] He was appointed Air Officer Commanding No. 1 Group in 1980, Air Member for Supply and Organisation in 1983 and UK Military Representative to NATO in 1986.[2] He retired in 1989.[2] He is now still actively involved with various charity and RAF related projects, maybe most notably, the “Vulcan to the Sky” project.[3]
In retirement he was Chairman of the Air League.[2]
Family[edit]
In 1967 he married Patricia Ann Davies; they have one son and two daughters. Knight enjoys rugby and music in his spare time.[2]
References[edit]

^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 39935. p. 4367. 11 August 1953. Retrieved 10 April 2011.
^ a b c d Debrett’s People of Today 1994
^ Vulcan rules the skies again after £6m facelift Daily Telegraph, 19 October 2007

Military offices

Preceded by
David Craig
Air Officer Commanding No. 1 Group
1980–1982
Succeeded by
David Parry-Evans

Preceded by
Sir John Rogers
Air Member for Supply and Organisation
1983–1985
Succeeded by
Sir Michael Armitage

Preceded by
Sir Thomas Morony
UK Military Representative to NATO
1986–1989
Succeeded by
Sir Richard Thomas

La Chaussée-sur-Marne

La Chaussée-sur-Marne

La Chaussée-sur-Marne

Location within Grand Est region 

La Chaussée-sur-Marne

Coordinates: 48°50′06″N 4°31′25″E / 48.835°N 4.5236°E / 48.835; 4.5236Coordinates: 48°50′06″N 4°31′25″E / 48.835°N 4.5236°E / 48.835; 4.5236

Country
France

Region
Grand Est

Department
Marne

Arrondissement
Vitry-le-François

Canton
Vitry-le-François-Est

Government

 • Mayor (2008–2014)
Christian Grandjean

Area1
22.05 km2 (8.51 sq mi)

Population (2006)2
670

 • Density
30/km2 (79/sq mi)

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

 • Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

INSEE/Postal code
51141 / 51240

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

La Chaussée-sur-Marne is a commune in the Marne department in the Grand Est region in north-eastern France. The town of La Chaussée-sur-Marne is located in the department of Marne of the French region Grand Est. The town of La Chaussée-sur-Marne is located in the township of Vitry-le-François-Est part of the district of Vitry-le-François.

Contents

1 Area code
2 Geography and map
3 Population and housing
4 See also
5 References

Area code[edit]
The area code for La Chaussée-sur-Marne is 51141 (also known as code INSEE), and the La Chaussée-sur-Marne zip code is 51240.[1]
Geography and map[edit]
The altitude of the city hall of La Chaussée-sur-Marne is approximately 100 meters. The La Chaussée-sur-Marne surface is 22.05 km ². The latitude and longitude of La Chaussée-sur-Marne are 48.835 degrees North and 4.518 degrees East. Nearby cities and towns of La Chaussée-sur-Marne are : Omey (51240) at 2.27 km, Ablancourt (51240) at 2.35 km, Saint-Martin-aux-Champs (51240) at 2.51 km, Cheppes-la-Prairie (51240) at 3.37 km, Aulnay-l’Aître (51240) at 3.38 km, Pogny (51240) at 3.62 km, Songy (51240) at 3.80 km, Vitry-la-Ville (51240) at 4.51 km.[2]
Population and housing[edit]
The population of La Chaussée-sur-Marne was 652 in 1999, 670 in 2006 and 673 in 2007. The population density of La Chaussée-sur-Marne is 30.52 inhabitants per km². The number of housing of La Chaussée-sur-Marne was 291 in 2007. T