Nasrabad, Khusf

For the village in Jolgeh-e Mazhan District, see Nasrabad, Jolgeh-e Mazhan.

Nasrabad
نصراباد

village

Nasrabad

Coordinates: 32°25′55″N 59°09′46″E / 32.43194°N 59.16278°E / 32.43194; 59.16278Coordinates: 32°25′55″N 59°09′46″E / 32.43194°N 59.16278°E / 32.43194; 59.16278

Country
 Iran

Province
South Khorasan

County
Khusf

Bakhsh
Central District

Rural District
Khusf

Population (2006)

 • Total
585

Time zone
IRST (UTC+3:30)

 • Summer (DST)
IRDT (UTC+4:30)

Nasrabad (Persian: نصرآباد‎‎, also Romanized as Naşrābād; also known as Nasīrābād and Nasr Abad Gheis Abad)[1] is a village in Khusf Rural District, Central District, Khusf County, South Khorasan Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 585, in 153 families.[2]
References[edit]

^ Nasrabad can be found at GEOnet Names Server, at this link, by opening the Advanced Search box, entering “-3076659” in the “Unique Feature Id” form, and clicking on “Search Database”.
^ “Census of the Islamic Republic of Iran, 1385 (2006)”. Islamic Republic of Iran. Archived from the original (Excel) on 2011-11-11. 

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Khusf County

Capital

Khusf

Districts

Central

Cities

Khusf
Mohammadshahr

Rural Districts
and villages

Khusf

Abdollah
Ahmad Shah Beyg
Aliabad
Aminabad
Arish
Ark
Baghan
Barmanj
Beynabad
Chah Kolak-e Pain
Chah-e Harif
Chah-e Rakateyha
Chah-e Zini Ha
Dahan Rud
Dastgerd
Deym
Do Kuheh
Fakhrabad
Fatemiyeh
Fedeshk
Galgun-e Bala
Ganjabad
Ganj-e Olya
Garung
Geyuk
Gusheh-ye Olya
Gusheh-ye Sofla
Halemi
Hamand
Hamech
Hami
Hamun
Howz-e Hasan Ali
Janbuk
Joft Rud
Jowmian
Kalateh-ye Karbalai Barat
Kalateh-ye Malek
Kalateh-ye Qassab
Kalateh-ye Sheykh
Kharam
Khvor
Mahmiran
Masumabad
Mehrabad
Nalinow
Nasrabad
Nughab
Qeysar
Razg
Salak
Sarv Bad
Shah Zileh
Shahneh
Shams-e Bala
Shashdang
Sivjan
Tajag
Taqab
Tuti
Zarkesh

Jolgeh-e Mazhan

Cities

none

Rural Districts
and villages

Barakuh

Ali Hajji-ye Pain
Aliabad
Allah Yar
Bagh Alishah
Chahkandak
Chahkand-e Gol
Cheshmeh-ye Zard
Dowlatabad
Duskam
Espigi
Eylaki-ye Bala
Eylaki-ye Pain
Feriz
Gazzeh
Givshad
Gol
Halvai
Havigan
Hesar
Holudar-e Pain
Hoseynabad
Jafarabad
Kalateh-ye Hasan Beyk
Kalateh-ye Khoda Bakhsh
Kalateh-ye Molla Khodadad
Kariz-e Now
Khalilan
Khvajegi
Marghuk
Mina Khun
Now Kaj
Nowdar
Nowduk
Nowrashk
Parmich
Qasabeh
Rubayat
Rumenjan
Saft-e Sorkh

Turtle Mountain Provincial Park

TurtleMountain

RidingMountain

DuckMountain

Porcupine Hills

Manitoba Escarpment

Turtle Mountain Provincial Park is a provincial park located in the southwestern portion of the Canadian province of Manitoba. Within it are the Adam Lake and Max Lake campgrounds. The park is known for its bike trails, fishing, back country cabins and canoe routes. Turtle Mountain Provincial Park is one of the most popular parks in Manitoba, especially among families and outdoor enthusiasts.
The park is named after the numerous painted turtles found in the area. The turtles can be seen throughout the warmer months sun bathing near permanent ponds or lakes in the park. In late spring and early summer the females can be seen laying eggs in sandy soil throughout the park.
Turtle Mountain Provincial Park was one of the first parks created in July 1960 with the passing of the Provincial Parks Act.
It is adjacent to the international border between Canada and the United States. Its southeast corner is adjacent to the International Peace Garden which is located in both Manitoba and the U.S. state of North Dakota. To the east is the William Lake Provincial Park, home to the William Lake Campground, and the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Administration. To the north is the town of Boissevain, with the city of Brandon farther north. Most of the park is situated in the southwesternmost section of the Municipality of Boissevain – Morton, while the rest of it lies in the southeast corner of the Municipality of Deloraine – Winchester.
The park is nearly coterminous with the slightly larger Turtle Mountain Provincial Forest. The only difference is a small section of the forest lying east of Manitoba Highway 10 at the southeast corner of the forest (near the International Peace Garden), which is outside the park’s territory.
Climate[edit]

Turtle Mountain Provincial Park, Manitoba

Climate chart (explanation)

J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D

 
 
23
 
 
−9
−19

 
 
21
 
 
−5
−16

 
 
23
 
 
0
−9

 
 
30
 
 
10
−2

 
 
66
 
 
18
5

 
 
84
 
 
22
10

 
 
75
 
 
25
13

 
 
67
 
 
25
12

 
 
48
 
 
18
6

 
 
43
 
 
11
0

 
 
28
 
 
−1
−9

 
 
23
 
 
−8
−17

Average max. and min. temper

Karl von Schmidt

This article is about the Prussian general. For people with the same or similar names, see Carl Schmidt.

Karl von Schmidt.

Karl von Schmidt (January 12, 1817 – August 25, 1875) was a Prussian cavalry general.
Schmidt was born at Schwedt on the Oder in the Province of Brandenburg, and entered the 4th Ulans as a second lieutenant in 1834.
Schmidt’s long regimental service was varied by staff service and instructional work, and in the mobilization of 1859 he had the command of a landwehr cavalry regiment. In 1863 he was made colonel of the 4th Cuirassiers, which he commanded in the, for the cavalry arm, uneventful campaigns in the Second Schleswig War of 1864 and the Austro-Prussian War of 1866. He then commanded a newly raised regiment of Schleswig-Holstein troops, the 16th Hussars, but at the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War he was still an obscure and perhaps a mistrusted officer, though his grasp of every detail of cavalry work was admitted. But an opportunity for distinction was grasped in the cavalry fighting around Mars-la-Tour (August 16), in which he temporarily led a brigade and was severely wounded. He was soon promoted major-general and succecded to the temporary command of his division on the disablement of its leader.
In this post Schmidt did brilliant work in the campaign on the Loire, and even in the winter operations towards Le Mans, and earned a reputation second to none amongst the officers and men of his arm. After the war he took a leading part in the reorganization of the Prussian cavalry, which in ten years raised its efficiency to a point far beyond that of any other cavalry in Europe. In 1875, though his health was failing, he refused to give up the conduct of certain important cavalry manoeuvres with which he had been entrusted. But a few days of heavy work in the field brought on a fatal illness, and he died at Danzig on the 25 August 1875. In 1889 the 4th Ulans, in which his regimental service was almost entirely spent, were given the name “von Schmidt”.
Schmidt’s drill and maneuvre instructions were codified and published after his death by his staff officer, Captain von Vollard Bockelberg, who was authorized by Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia to do so. An English translation, Instructions for Cavalry, was published by the War Office. Schmidt himself wrote a pamphlet, Auch ein Wonber die Ausbsldung den Cavallenie (1862). The original German edition of the Instructions for Cavalry is prefaced by a memoir of Schmi

Visa policy of Ecuador

Entry and exit stamps.

Ecuador has one of the most lenient visa policies in the world as most visitors are not obliged to obtain a visa for stays up to 90 days, except citizens of Peru who are allowed a maximum stay of 180 days, and citizens of China who are allowed to stay for 90 days per calendar year. All visitors must hold a passport valid for 6 months, except for citizens of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay. Citizens of those countries can also enter Ecuador with ID card only.[1]

Contents

1 Visa policy map
2 Visa requirement
3 Galapagos
4 Visitor statistics
5 See also
6 References
7 External links

Visa policy map[edit]

Visa policy of Ecuador

Visa requirement[edit]
Nationals of the following 12 countries require a visa for Ecuador.[1]

 Afghanistan
 Bangladesh
 Cuba[2] [3] [4]
 Eritrea

 Ethiopia
 Haiti1
 Kenya
   Nepal

 Nigeria
 Pakistan
 Senegal
 Somalia

1 – A visa is not required if holding an approval code.
Galapagos[edit]
All visitors to Galápagos Islands must pre-register online and obtain a Transit Control Card at the airport.[5]
Visitor statistics[edit]
Most visitors arriving to Ecuador in 2014 were nationals of the following countries:[6]

Country
2014

 Colombia
375,755

 United States
259,468

 Peru
175,678

 Venezuela
119,795

 Spain
67,652

 Argentina
58,607

 Chile
43,896

 Cuba
41,547

 Germany
33,317

 Canada
33,240

Total
1,557,006

See also[edit]

Ecuador portal

Visa requirements for Ecuadorian citizens

References[edit]

^ a b “Ecuador (EC) country information”. Timatic. IATA. Retrieved 17 December 2013. 
^ http://www.trust.org/item/20151126234425-suxrr
^ https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/the_americas/ecuador-to-require-cubans-to-get-entry-visas/2015/11/26/8b126a06-9499-11e5-befa-99ceebcbb272_story.html
^ http://cnnespanol.cnn.com/2015/11/26/ecuador-solicitara-visa-de-turista-a-los-cubanos-desde-el-1-de-diciembre/
^ Pre-registro TCT
^ [1]

External links[edit]

Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores, Comercio e Integración
Galapagos registration

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Visa policy by country

Visa
Passport
Travel document

Africa

Central

Angola
Cameroon
Central African Republic
Chad
DR Congo
R Congo
Equatorial Guinea
Gabon
Sao Tome and Principe

Eastern

Burundi
Comoros
Djibouti
Eritrea
Et
연예인야동

Taty Sumirah

Taty Sumirah is a retired female badminton player of Indonesia.
Career[edit]
Sumirah was runner-up to England’s Margaret Beck at the World Invitation Tournament, a forerunner of the IBF World Championships, held in Jakarta in 1974.[1] She won the bronze medal at the 1980 IBF World Championships in women’s singles. Sumirah was a member of several Indonesian Uber Cup (women’s international) teams, helping the 1975 team to win the world championship.[2]
References[edit]

^ “World Invitation Tournament is Huge Success,” World Badminton, October 1974, 2, 3.
^ Pat Davis, The Guinness Book of Badminton (Enfield, Middlesex, England: Guinness Superlatives Ltd., 1983) 134, 135.

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Uber Cup Badminton Champions in Women’s Team

1957: USA (Lois Alston & Judy Devlin & Susan Devlin & Ethel Marshall & Bea Massman & Margaret Varner Bloss)
1960: USA (Judy Devlin & Susan Devlin & Dorothy O’Neill & Margaret Varner Bloss)
1963: USA (Tyna Barinaga & Judy Hashman & Caroline Jensen & Dorothy O’Neill & Carlene Starkey & McGregor Stewart)
1966: JPN (Hiroe Amano & Kazuko Goto & Noriko Nakayama & Tomoko Takahashi & Fumiko Yokoi & Mitsuko Yokoyama)
1969: JPN (Hiroe Amano & Noriko Nakayama & Tomoko Takahashi & Hiroe Yuki)
1972: JPN (Machiko Aizawa & Noriko Nakayama & Kaoru Takasaka & Etsuko Toganoo & Hiroe Yuki)
1975: INA (Utami Kinard & Regina Masli & Minarni & Taty Sumirah & Theresia Widiastuti & Imelda Wiguno)
1978: JPN (Saori Kondo & Noriko Nakayama & Mikiko Takada & Atsuko Tokuda & Emiko Ueno & Yoshiko Yonekura & Hiroe Yuki)
1981: JPN (Saori Kondo & Mikiko Takada & Atsuko Tokuda & Yoshiko Yonekura)
1984: CHN (Han Aiping & Li Lingwei & Lin Ying & Qian Ping & Wu Dixi & Wu Jianqiu & Xu Rong & Zhang Ailing)
1986: CHN (Guan Weizhen & Han Aiping & Lao Yujing & Li Lingwei & Lin Ying & Wu Dixi & Wu Jianqiu & Zheng Yuli)
1988: CHN (Gu Jiaming & Guan Weizhen & Han Aiping & Lao Yujing & Li Lingwei & Lin Ying & Shang Fumei & Shi Wen & Zheng Yuli)
1990: CHN (Guan Weizhen & Huang Hua & Lai Caiqin & Nong Qunhua & Shi Fangjing & Shi Xiaohui & Tang Jiuhong & Yao Fen & Zhou Lei)
1992: CHN (Guan Weizhen & Hu Ning & Huang Hua & Lin Yanfen & Nong Qunhua & Tang Jiuhong & Wu Yuhong &
부산오피

Time Turns Elastic

Time Turns Elastic

Studio album by Trey Anastasio and Don Hart

Released
May 12, 2009 (US)

Recorded
August – November 2008

Genre
Classical, progressive rock

Length
43:07

Label
Rubber Jungle Records

Trey Anastasio and Don Hart chronology

The Horseshoe Curve
(2007)
Time Turns Elastic
(2009)
Traveler
(2012)

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating

Allmusic
[1]

Time Turns Elastic is an album by Trey Anastasio consisting mainly of his work by the same name for orchestra, electric guitar, and vocals. Written with composer and arranger Don Hart, it was recorded in the autumn of 2008 by Anastasio, Hart, and the Northwest Sinfonia. The album also features a solo demo version performed by Anastasio on acoustic guitar.
Anastasio began writing the piece in 2006 in preparation for a potential Phish reunion, which was announced in October 2008. Days before the reunion announcement, Anastasio debuted “Time Turns Elastic” with Don Hart and Orchestra Nashville at the Ryman Auditorium on September 28, 2008. Anastasio performed the piece again in May 2009 with Marin Alsop and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. Trey also performed the piece with the New York Philharmonic at Carnegie Hall in September 2009.
Phish recorded a version of “Time Turns Elastic” as the first single from their reunion album Joy released in September 2009 and debuted their version in concert on May 31, 2009 at Fenway Park in Boston. The track, clocking in at 13:30, contains a diverse array of time signatures including 4/4, 5/4 and 11/4.

Contents

1 Track listing
2 Credits
3 External links
4 References

Track listing[edit]

Time Turns Elastic – 29:38 (Anastasio/Hart)

Song at Dawn 5:23
Ruby Shaded Sea 4:02
Submarine 3:33
Landslide 8:35
Rays of Blue Light 7:23
Silver Sound Shower 2:03
Hailstorm 2:39
Funnels 7:01
Carousel 2:28

Time Turns Elastic (Original Acoustic Demo) – 13:29 (Anastasio)

Credits[edit]

Performed Trey Anastasio, Don Hart, and the Northwest Sinfonia
Recorded and Mixed by Brian Montgomery and John Siket
Engineered by Roy Hendrickson
Mastered by Bob Ludwig
Conducted by Paul Gambill

External links[edit]

Trey Anastasio’s Official Website’

References[edit]

^ Allmusic review

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Trey Anastasio

Studio albums

One Man’s Trash
Trampled by Lambs and Pecked by the Dove
Trey Anastasio
Seis De Mayo
Shine
Bar 17
The Horseshoe Curve
Time Turns Elastic
Traveler
Paper Wheels

Live albums

Plasma
Original Bo

Dionisia de Santa María Mitas Talangpaz

This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (May 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Dionisia de Santa María Mitas Talangpaz y Pamintuan

Servant of God, co-founder, Augustinian Recollect Sisters

Born
March 12, 1691
Calumpit, Bulacan, Captaincy General of the Philippines

Died
October 12, 1732
San Sebastian, Manila, Captaincy General of the Philippines

Venerated in
Roman Catholic Church

Feast
October 12

Mother Dionisia Talangpaz is a Filipino Roman Catholic figure. Along with her sister Cecilia Rosa de Jesús Talangpaz, she founded the “Beaterio de San Sebastián de Calumpang” (now the Congregation of the Augustinian Recollect Sisters), in 1719. The Augustinian Recollect Sisters is the second-oldest native Filipino congregation for women religious founded in the Philippines, after the Religious of the Virgin Mary, established by Venerable Mother Ignacia del Espíritu Santo.

Contents

1 Life
2 Beaterio de San Sebastián
3 The controversy
4 The house built on rock
5 Death
6 Servant of God
7 References

Life[edit]
Talangpaz was born on March 12, 1691, in Calumpit, Bulacan to half-Kapampangan parents. Together with her younger sister Cecilia, they settled down near the shrine of the Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Manila. Their devout life attracted the attention of the shrine’s caretakers, the Augustinian Recollects, and in July 1725, the sisters received the habit of tertiaries and were gathered in a beaterio. The Talangpaz sisters were notably descended from ancient pre-Hispanic nobility on both sides of their family.
As explained earlier, the matriarchs of this venerable clan may well have been catalonan who officiated at spiritual rites held on a hallowed rock, the meaning of “Talangpaz.”
The sisters’ maternal great-granduncle, hermano Phelipe Sonsong (1611–1684), of Macabebe, Pampanga, was a Jesuit brother who was martyred in the Marianas. A deep devotee of Our Lady of Carmel, he also presaged the special Marian devotion of the sisters. Their maternal grandfather, Don Augustin Pamintuan, figured prominently in the Pampango Revolt of 1660.
Beaterio de San Sebastián[edit]
Two blood sisters, Mother Dionicia Mitas Talangpaz de Santa Maria (1691–1732) and Mother Cecilia Rosa Talangpaz de Jesus 91693-1731), of Calumpit, Bulacan, fo

Lemelson–MIT Prize

The Lemelson-MIT Program awards several prizes yearly to inventors in the United States. The largest is the Lemelson–MIT Prize which was endowed in 1994 by Jerome H. Lemelson, funded by the Lemelson Foundation, and is administered through the School of Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The winner receives $500,000, making it the largest cash prize for invention in the U.S.
The $100,000 Lemelson-MIT Award for Global Innovation (previously named the Award for Sustainability) was last awarded in 2013. The Award for Global Innovation replaced the $100,000 Lemelson-MIT Lifetime Achievement Award, which was awarded from 1995-2006. The Lifetime Achievement Award recognized outstanding individuals whose pioneering spirit and inventiveness throughout their careers improved society and inspired others.
The Lemelson-MIT Program also awards invention prizes for college students, called the Lemelson-MIT Student Prize.

Contents

1 List of winners
2 See also
3 References
4 External links

List of winners[edit]

2016

Ramesh Raskar (Lemelson–MIT Prize)[1]

2015

Jay Whitacre (Lemelson–MIT Prize)[2]

2014

Sangeeta N. Bhatia (Lemelson–MIT Prize)

2013

Angela Belcher (Lemelson–MIT Prize)[3]
Rebecca Richards-Kortum and Maria Oden (Lemelson–MIT Award for Global Innovation)

2012

Stephen Quake

Stephen Quake (Lemelson–MIT Prize)[4]

(Scientist, Inventor, Entrepreneur, Professor of Biophysics and Genomics at Stanford University)

Ashok Gadgil (Lemelson–MIT Award for Global Innovation)

2011

John A. Rogers

John A. Rogers (Lemelson–MIT Prize)

(Professor, Physical Chemist, and Materials Scientist at Northwestern University)

Elizabeth Hausler (Lemelson–MIT Award for Sustainability)

2010

Carolyn Bertozzi, receiving the Emanuel Merck Lectureship in 2011

Carolyn Bertozzi (Lemelson–MIT Prize)
BP Agrawal (Lemelson–MIT Award for Sustainability)

2009

Chad Mirkin

Chad Mirkin (Lemelson–MIT Prize)

George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Medicine, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, and Director of the International Institute for Nanotechnology and Center for Nanofabrication and Molecular Self-Assembly at Northwestern University

Joel Selanikio[5] (Lemelson–MIT Award for Sustainability)

CEO and co-Founder, Magpi, and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Georgetown Universi

HMS Boscawen (1844)

For other ships with the same name, see HMS Boscawen.

HMS Boscawen, 1904

History

UK

Name:
HMS Boscawen

Ordered:
11 May 1817

Builder:
Woolwich Dockyard

Laid down:
January 1826

Launched:
3 April 1844

Fate:
Broken up, 1914

General characteristics [1]

Class and type:
70-gun third rate ship of the line

Tons burthen:
2048 tons (2080.9 tonnes)

Length:
187 ft 4 1⁄2 in (57.1 m) (gundeck)

Beam:
50 ft 9 in (15.47 m)

Depth of hold:
21 ft 6 in (6.55 m)

Propulsion:
Sails

Sail plan:
Full rigged ship

Armament:

70 guns:
Gundeck: 28 × 32 pdrs, 2 × 68 pdr carronades
Upper gundeck: 32 × 24 pdrs
Quarterdeck: 4 × 24 pdrs, 10 × 32 pdr carronades
Forecastle: 2 × 24 pdrs, 2 × 32 pdr carronades

HMS Boscawan was a 70-gun third rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 3 April 1844 at Woolwich Dockyard. She was originally ordered and begun as a 74-gun ship, but an Admiralty order dated 3 March 1834 required that she be reworked to Sir William Symonds’ design.[1] She was named for Admiral Edward Boscawen.
In 1874, Boscawen was converted into a training ship and renamed Wellesley.[citation needed] She was broken up in 1914.[1]
Notes[edit]

^ a b c Lavery, Ships of the Line, vol. 1, p. 192.

References[edit]

Lavery, Brian (2003) The Ship of the Line – Volume 1: The development of the battlefleet 1650-1850. Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-252-8.

This article about a ship of the line of the United Kingdom is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Olympus SP-510 Ultra Zoom

Olympus SP-510UZ (Ultra Zoom)

Overview

Type
Bridge digital camera

Lens

Lens
Fixed 38 – 380mm (10x Optical Zoom)

Sensor/Medium

Sensor
1/2.5″ CCD

Maximum resolution
3,072 × 2304 (7.1 megapixels)

ASA/ISO range
Auto,50–4000 (2500 and 4000 are used up to 3mp)

Storage
xD Picture Card

Focusing

Focus modes
iESP, auto, spot AF, selective AF target, manual

Exposure/Metering

Exposure modes
Digital iESP multi-pattern, Center-Weighted, Spot [1]

Shutter

Shutter speed range
15 s – 1/1000 s, Bulb

Continuous shooting
1.65 frame/s

Viewfinder

Viewfinder
Electronic viewfinder

General

Rear LCD monitor
2.5″ TFT LCD, 115,000 pixels, live preview capable

Battery
4 AA Batteries

Weight
11.6 oz / 325 g (w/o batteries and memory card)

Made in
 Indonesia

The Olympus SP-510UZ (Ultra Zoom) is a 7.1-megapixel bridge digital camera introduced by Olympus Corporation in 2006. It replaced the 6 megapixel SP-500UZ model that was launched in 2005. It was the last model of the SP-series (Special Performance) that used a 10x optical zoom lens. It was also the last of the larger-sized 10x optical ultra zoom cameras to be made by Olympus, which had been part of the C-series before the SP-series was produced. The SP-510UZ model can be traced back to the C-2100 Ultra Zoom, which was launched back in 2000. [2] The successor model to the SP-510UZ was the SP-550UZ. It used a longer 18x optical zoom lens. Today, the newest model in the Ultra Zoom camera line, the SP-590UZ, features a 26x optical zoom lens. In 2009, Olympus released a compact camera with a 10x optical zoom lens. However, it does not use the Ultra Zoom name nor is it a part of the SP-series line of cameras. [3]

Contents

1 Features
2 Lens
3 Flash
4 Movies
5 Power source
6 Accessories
7 References
8 External links

Features[edit]
The Olympus SP-510UZ features a 2.5″ LCD display, a 10x zoom lens, and 5x digital zoom in a compact lightweight plastic body. It is designed to satisfy the needs of both hobbyist photographers who desire full control over exposure settings and those that need only point and shoot simplicity. Two notable features of the camera is that it contains an EVF (electronic view finder), a feature found in high-end digital cameras, and the ability to capture images in RAW format. The SP-510UZ has an earlier sister model, the SP-500UZ. Two major differences between the two cameras are that the SP-500UZ has a 6.0MP sensor and has a black body while the SP-51